Loader
0
0

Creating A Raw Wood Look Without Bleach

Okay, so I’ll try to make this short! I purchased a completely different dining room set back in September of last year and when I finally got around to refinishing it (I was busy) it just didn’t work in our space. So, I contacted a fellow refinisher Roadside Revival Re-Creations after seeing 4 of the chairs above. I loved what she had done with them and asked (okay more like begged) if she had a table and two more chairs she was willing to swap me for. She found two more similar chairs (shown without the seat covers) and this table, which I thought was a great fit for the chairs and, more importantly, our space! I planned to refinish the table myself and was hoping to leave it raw. However, once it was sanded down I knew I wouldn’t be able to just seal it & call it a day. The leaf was a different wood and between that, the red tones, and the various discoloration throughout there was just no way I could do that. I immediately ruled out actually bleaching the wood because once you do that you forever change the wood and I just wasn’t willing to risk it. I decided to use paint instead to create the raw wood look I was going for, which would tone down the red, conceal any discoloration, and blend the three pieces together. Also, if for some reason I didn’t like it I could easily change it. I chose Worn Tapestry by Vintiques Chalk Type Paint and simply applied it like a wash. If I applied the paint too thick I’d just dip my brush in water and thin it out enough to reveal the wood grain and not all of the flaws. After just one coat I had the look I wanted and added a coat of the Vintiques Spray Wax in Clear over the entire table. We then moved it into our dining space and while I had just sucessfully created the look I was going for, I didn’t love it. Turns out I’m not as ready as I thought I was for the bleached/raw look. However, if you love this look then you can stop right here…just add a top coat and you’re done! But if you’d like to see what I did next, please continue to read below πŸ™‚ I grabbed two more Spray Waxes out of my cabinet. I’m in love with these, btw! The spray wax comes in 13 different colors plus the clear in both lines (Heirloom Traditions & Vintiques), dries in 30-45 minutes, and does not require buffing. I already had a coat of the Clear Spray Wax on, so I added Driftwood sparingly with my ClingOn paint brush. These brushes are used wet/damp and work great with all of my products. I like to pour the Spray Wax into containers with lids so that I can easily store any unused portions for my next project. I also prefer to brush the wax on vs spraying it.

You can see the difference the Dark Umber spray wax made (below) and it was much more to my liking. The Driftwood spray wax is definetly a blue gray and I immediately wiped back most of it using a damp sponge. It was a little too dark for my needs but once I applied the Dark Umber spray wax over it it was perfectly subdued. I really liked the look of it but decided it was best to stick with the Dark Umber for the table top. Although, I plan to use more of the Driftwood on my next project because I think it creates a really beautiful look. You can see where I used it on the corner edge of the table. *Use a damp sponge to wipe back and/or remove any excess, & blend in any of the colored waxes. This is not necessary when using the Clear.
After I finished applying the wax I needed to seal the top with something a little more durable…this is a dining table, so it needs a good sealer. The Vintiques Top Coat can be applied over wax and is available in a Matte finish, so the choice was easy. *Heirloom Traditions has the same top coat under the Aqua Clear label. Again, I used my ClingOn paint brush to apply it in two thin coats, with a 2-4 hour drying time in between coats. It covered beautifully and went on really easy. It’s water based, does NOT have any stinky odors, and will NOT yellow like other polys can. It’s truly fabulous.

And here is my finished table, albeit in a more natural color vs my first raw/bleached look but I love it and hope you do, too πŸ™‚

I should mention that for the table skirt and legs I used a mix of Worn Tapestry, Dearly Distressed, and Mocha.

 

 

20 Comments

Wow – what a brilliant way to harmonize all of the disparate woods. This set is now museum worthy…thank you so much for sharing your secrets! I can think of so many times when this method will come in handy!

So very beautiful! Can’t wait to try some of these products. Thanks for sharing.

Exquisite!! So funny that you’ve just posted this, as I have been fighting a similar situation with a client’s table. Your end- END result is exactly what we are looking for! Thank you so much for sharing!!! You’re a doll and a lifesaver!

Yay! I’m thrilled that my post was able to help you & your client πŸ™‚

Oh, this is gorgeous!! I need to do something to our dining room table (have to convince the hubby first) – but I’m loving this look. I’m assuming you’d need to re-apply the wax occasionally? Can I ask how often? TIA!

Thank you πŸ™‚ Nope, you never need to reapply the spray wax. Also, it’s sealed with a Top Coat.

Wow, what a transformation and the table no longer has that dated finish. The first piece of furniture I ever stripped (at 15 yrs old) I found two different types of wood but since I was staining it I only tried to leave the stain on darker and that didn’t work. But this trick worked great!

Julia,
Oh my, your table transformed into such a beautiful piece of furniture! It looks like you bought it from Restoration Hardware! I’m going to have to bookmark this post for future reference. Your painting skills are beyond my skills and I will glean information from you! Love this post and project!

Thank you very much πŸ™‚ Anyone can achieve this look as I always look for the easiest way to do things πŸ˜‰

This is FABULOUS! I have never see the spray wax before but I can think of at least 2-3 projects sitting in my garage right now that would totally benefit from this stuff. Awesome job – love the final table color!